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Updates – Ljubljana #2

23 Oct

A simple walk through Ljubljana it’s a really nice experience…..especially along the river banks, full of restaurants, bars and shops…

Below, Novi trg. The name Novi trg, which originally referred to a separate urban area on the left bank of the Ljubljanica river, is now used in reference to an open space in the centre of Ljubljana’s elegant quarter extending between the Križanke Summer Theatre, Vegova ulica street and Dvorni trg square. Settled in the 12th century, the area was only incorporated into the city and its walls in the 14th century. A new city gate was built near the present Dvorni trg square and named Vice Duke’s Gate (Vicedomska/Fištamska vrata) after the nearby Vice Duke’s Palace (Vicedomska/Fištanska palača), which stood on the site of the present University of Ljubljana building. The buildings surrounding Novi trg notably included the Carniolan provincial estates palace called Lontovž, which occupied the site of the present Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, and Auersperg Palace, Ljubljana’s most beautiful Baroque palace, destroyed in the earthquake of 1895. The site of the latter is now occupied by the National and University Library, built by the architect Jože Plečnik between 1936 and 1941. The building located at the top of the square, at No. 3 Gosposka ulica street, is Barbo Palace (Barbova palača), built at the beginning of the 1750s on commission from Count Barbo von Waxenstein. It was designed by the architect Matija Persky on the model of Viennese palaces of the time.

You have to walk with your nose up to see all the beauty on the city old buildings…..

(below St. Jacob Church)

(below,the oldest students residence)

(below, Ljubljana Opera House) The theatre building, constructed in 1892, has a varied history. At the turn of the 20th century it housed first the German Theatre (Nemško gledališče) and then the Provincial Theatre (Deželno gledališče). 1918 saw the establishment of the theatre’s opera and ballet ensembles and orchestra, which, after the Second World War, began to tour outside the country and receive international acclaim. The Opera House’s façade has two niches adorned with Alojzij Gangl’s allegorical statues of Tragedy and Comedy. The building’s characteristic appearance is mainly due to the richly adorned front façade with Ionic columns supporting a majestic tympanum above the entrance. The allegorical sculptures in the tympanum represent Poetry and Glory, and the figure with a torch above them – another work by Alojzij Gangl – an allegory of Genius. The stone pedestals in front of the building support the busts of the Slovenian theatre artists Anton Verovšek and Ignacij Borštnik sculpted by France Kralj in 1921, and the pedestal by the side of the building Stojan Batič’s portrait sculpture of Julij Betetto.

Republic Square, at first named Revolution Square, is the largest square in Ljubljana. It was designed in the second half of the 20th century by Edvard Ravnikar. On 26 June 1991, the independence of Slovenia was declared here. The National Assembly Building stands at its northern side.The four-storey building is externally austere. A freestanding cube, is inlaid with Karst marble, with green Oplotnica granite below each window. The only decorative element is the two storey main portal – four oak doors surrounded by statues by Zdenko Kalin and Karel Putrih which represent working people.

Congress Square (Kongresni trg) is one of the most important centers of the city. It was built in 1821 for ceremonial purposes such as Congress of Ljubljana after which it was named. Since then it became an important center for political ceremonies, demonstrations and protests, such as the ceremony at creation of Kingdom of Yugoslavia, ceremony of liberation of Belgrade, protests against Yugoslav authority in 1988 etc. The square also houses several important buildings, such as the University of Ljubljana Palace, Philharmonic Hall, Ursuline Church of the Holy Trinity, and the Slovene Society Building. Star Park (Park Zvezda) is located in the center of the square.

(below, the University of Ljubljana)

Town Hall (Mestna hišaMagistrat), located at Town Square, is the seat of the City Municipality of Ljubljana. The original building was built in a Gothic style in 1484. Between 1717 and 1719, the building underwent a Baroque renovation with a Venetian inspiration by the architect Gregor Maček, Sr.

Near Town Hall, at Town Square, stands a replica of the Baroque Robba Fountain. The original has been moved into the National Gallery in 2006. The Robba Fountain is decorated with an obelisk at the foot of which there are three figures in white marble symbolising the three chief rivers of Carniola. It is work of Francesco Robba, who designed numerous other Baroque statues in the city.

The Vodnikov square was built after the devastating earthquake of 1895, when an old monastery housing a diocesan college and a library had to be pulled down. The space gained was dedicated for use as an outdoor market. The square was named after the Slovenian poet Valentin Vodnik, whose monument by Alojzij Gangl had stood on its site since 1889. Across the street from the monument, which gives the square a special character, a walking path leads to Ljubljana’s castle hill. From Monday to Saturday, the square is the site of Ljubljana’s Central Market (Osrednja tržnica), which stretches from the Dragon Bridge across the Pogačarjev trg square to the Triple Bridge. The lower, riverside end of the square is occupied by a monumental colonnade building designed by the architect Jože Plečnik’s. The building houses a covered part of the Central Market and thus serves its original purpose.

The National and University Library, whose archives contain, among other things, a rich collection of medieval manuscripts, incunabula and Renaissance prints, was built between 1936 and 1941 to designs by Jože Plečnik. It is considered to be the architect’s most important work in Slovenia. It stands on the site of the former Ducal Court (Knežji dvorec), a 17th century Baroque palace destroyed in the earthquake of 1895. The building’s exterior reflects Italian influences. Its characteristic façade, combining bricks and stone blocks in variable finishes, was modelled on Zuccari Palace (Palazzo Zuccari) in Rome. Each of the two handles on the main entrance door is decorated with a head of Pegasus, a winged horse symbolically guiding visitors to the realm of knowledge. From the vestibule, a door leads to the famous monumental central staircase with 32 pillars of black Podpeč marble and further on to the library’s grand reading room. The reading room’s most outstanding details are Plečnik’s chandeliers and a couple of glass walls allowing light to reach wooden reader desks and books from two sides. The Library’s side entrance is surmounted by a bronze statue of Moses by the Slovenian sculptor Lojze Dolinar.

(below, the Glasbena Matica, the music cultural association house)

I was in Budapest some years ago, and the majesty of Ljubljana reminded me a lot of the hungarian capital, I was so impressed by the history among all those beautiful buildings and streets and squares…

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Posted by on October 23, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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