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Updates – September

Another busy one….it started the first day of the month with mom’s birthday…..my daughter boyfriend contributed to the celebration dinner with this sooooo good appetizer, canapes with cannellini beans and bacon

my daughter with her famous zucchini and speck pie

I baked some mini pizzas….

a lasagna pan….

and some tasty asparagus

My mom baked her favourite cake, with pineapple and rhum.

One of my collegue, after years of partnership, decided to marry, so one day we had lunch all together to celebrate her…..for once, no problems, no resentment, no hierarchy, just happy faces….

The second-last day of this so very beautiful, unusual and interesting exhibition, my daughter and I hurried to visit, and I’m so glad we did! “A tea with Queen Elizabeth II” at the Glauco Lombardi Museum in Parma, is an idea of Marina Minelli, journalist and historian, with a true passion for crowned heads around the world. In the two ground floor halls of the Riserva Palace, more than three hundred pieces of ceramics (created by companies such as Wedgwood, Spode, Burleigh, Royal Albert, Mason’s, Churchill, Royal Doulton, Aynsley) tell the story of the royal family starting with Queen Victoria, Elizabeth II’s great-grandmother, whose long reign not only coincides with the exponential growth of manufactories in the famous Staffordshire district, but it also paves the way for the great celebrations both political and familiar of an ever-popular and beloved dynasty.
Memorials, or as they call it overseas, ceramic commemoratives are one of the key elements of this relationship. Mugs, cups and teapots decorated with symbols of the monarchy or with the faces of real royal characters favor the popular sharing of events related to the dynasty because through these objects the subjects can symbolically take part in a celebration and do it through the English rite for excellence: the afternoon tea.

On display there are objects dedicated to Edoardo VII, Prince of Wales for all his life, but king only for nine years, and then to his son Giorgio V, celebrated in potteries along with his very royal wife Mary, at the coronation in 1911 and later for the Silver Jubilee in 1935. By the end of 1936 his heir Edward VIII decided to abdicate to marry the woman who has been dating for years and abdication not only deeply marks British history but also risks sending the ceramic factories to bankruptcy. The production of coronation items has already begun and hundreds of manufactures must suddenly head back, store mugs and cups with the face of the former king and create new ones with the reassuring image of George VI and Queen Elizabeth.

(below, Marina, exceptionally present for the day, explaining to us what we were admiring)

Young Elizabeth II continues the heritage of the royal family after his father’s death on February 6, 1952, and his coronation on June 2, 1953 represents not only the beginning of a new kingdom, but the rebirth of a country that bravely endured Hitler’s bombs but still carries the heavy signs of a devastating war. The amount of memorabilia produced for the occasion is directly proportional to the popular enthusiasm for the new kingdom and it attests not only to the importance of the Westminster ceremony, whose ritual is unchanged from the Middle Ages, but also to the economic and social recovery of England and its industries after the nightmare of the conflict and the restrictions on rationing. Other items will be produced in the years to come for the wedding of Charles and Diana in 1981, for the birth of their children and grandchildren, for the jubilees of the queen and for her nineteenth birthday celebrated in 2016.

There are also postcards, newspapers and magazines in English, French and Italian from the 1950s to the present, which help to rebuild the events of the period. In addition, some special services for the Coronation of 1953 and the Silver Jubilee of 1977 have been used to set up vintage tea tables and dining tables.
For this event – notes Francesca Sandrini, the museum curator – there is also some contribution coming from the collections of the Museo Lombardi, that made available two of its pieces, never exposed to the public and yet consistent with the exhibition proposed, such as a beautiful desk service decorated with jasperware medallions and a great print of Queen Victoria’s crowning in 1838.

(below, Marina explaining how to set up a true english tea table)

After the visit, all the presents were invited to have a real english tea, equipped with all the options….cakes, muffins, scones, biscuits and two classics, battenberg cake and clotted cream….

It really was an amazing experience, loving all that’s english as we do!

And then it was my birthday…..I celebrated it first having lunch with two of my collegues/friends at our favourite vegan restaurant…..

That night I had dinner with my family….and I got some gifts…..

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Posted by on October 27, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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Updates – Austria

We crossed the border to Austria and drove till the Millstatter See (lake Millstatter) where we found a nice B&B in Seeboden, Haus Hatrieb, with a nice view from our balcony….

We felt immediately at home, being in Austria is just like home, and the beauty of the place helped a lot

And the lake in itself was a real pleasure to enjoy

One day we drove through a beautiful valley till the Ossiacher See……last time we were there was in 1995….

Ossiach Abbey is a former Benedictine monastery now one of the venues of an annual music festival called “Carinthian Summer” and it houses also a very good hotel…..the attached church…is still a church…

In 878 the East Frankish king Carloman of Bavaria dedicated the Treffen estates around Lake Ossiach to the Benedictine monastery of Ötting. In the late 10th century the lands passed to the Bishops of Passau and later to Emperor Henry II, who conferred them to a certain Count Ozi, affiliated with the Styrian Otakar dynasty and father of Patriarch Poppo of Aquileia. A church probably already existed at Ossiach, when Count Ozi about 1024 established the Benedictine abbey, the first in the medieval Duchy of Carinthia. The first monks probably descended from Niederaltaich Abbey in Bavaria. Ozi’s son Poppo succeeded in removing the proprietary monastery from the influence of the Salzburg archbishops and to affiliate it with the Patriarchate of Aquileia, confirmed by Emperor Conrad II in 1028. Upon the extinction of the Styrian Otakars in 1192, the Vogtei of Ossiach according to the Georgenberg Pact passed to the Austrian House of Babenberg. In 1282 it finally fell to the Habsburgs.

Ossiach Abbey was dissolved by order of Emperor Joseph II in 1783, after which the buildings were used as a barracks. In 1816 the premises were largely demolished. Between 1872 and 1915 the few remaining buildings were again used as a barracks and as stabling. Since 1995 the premises have been owned by the administration of Carinthia.

According to legend, King Bolesław II the Bold of Poland, after he was banished in 1079 for the murder of Saint Stanislaus of Szczepanów and had fled to Hungary,  wandered through Europe and found peace at last when he arrived at Ossiach in 1081. There the king is said to have lived in the remote monastery as a mute penitent for eight years humbly doing the meanest and lowliest jobs, until on his death bed he told his father confessor who he was and what he had been doing penance for. The legend is documented since the 15th century; whether Bolesław actually ever lived at Ossiach could not be conclusively clarified. Bolesław’s alleged tomb is embedded in the northern side of the church wall, a Roman marble relief depicting a horse with the Latin inscription: REX BOLESLAVS OCCISOR SANCTI STANISLAI EPISCOPI CRACOVIENSIS (“Boleslav, King of Poland, Murderer of Saint Stanislav, Bishop of Cracow”).

The church since the dissolution has served the local parish. Two stained glass windows were donated by Karl May in 1905, though according to recent research the popular writer had probably never visited Ossiach. The Romanesque church itself was first mentioned in 1215, built on the groundplan of a basilica, with the tower above the crossing. Restored in a Late Gothic style after a fire in 1484, the abbey, a member of the Benedictine Salzburg Congregation from 1641, was extensively altered in the Baroque period, including stucco decoration of the Wessobrunner School.

We had lunch at the same restaurant of 22 years ago (now completely renovated), and in the afternoon we just relaxed enjoying the view….

Another short drive was through another beatiful landscape towards Osstirol region and the village of Matrei……

…..just to have lunch at a place we already love and appreciated over the years….

We spent our last day in Austria driving along the Drava valley…..

so to reach the village of Spittal…..

We’ve been there already recently, in 2015, so I just wandered around taking more pictures, enjoying the sights….for more about the castle, read here….

And with that our vacation was over….sadly enough…but we came back home with a lot to fill our photos’ album and our souls….

 

 

 
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Posted by on October 26, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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Updates – Ljubljana #3

The central square in Ljubljana is Prešeren Square (Prešernov trg).

It’s no exaggeration to say that Prešeren Sqaure is not only the centre of Ljubljana, but truly the spiritual centre of the Slovene nation – and more practically the defacto meeting point in the city. It is part of the old town’s pedestrian zone and a major meeting point, where festivals, Ljubljana carnival, concerts, sports, political, and protest events take place. It was renovated in 2007. To the south, across the Triple Bridge (Tromostovje), it is connected to Stritar Street (Stritarjeva ulica), which leads through a symbolic town gate formed by the Kresija Palace and Philip Mansion towards the city’s town hall at the foothills of the Castle Hill. At the eastern side of the square, a bronze statue of the Slovene national poet France Prešeren with a muse was placed in front of the Central Pharmacy. One of his poem, “A Toast”/ “Zdravljica” became the national anthem. The poet’s statue is symbolically faced by the statue of Julija Primic, his great love, mounted on the facade of a building located across the square, in the Wolfova ulica.

The Franciscan Church of the Annunciation is a Franciscan church; Its red colour is symbolic of the Franciscan monastic order. Since 2008, the church has been protected as a cultural monument of national significance of Slovenia. Built between 1646 and 1660 (the bell towers following later), it replaced an older church on the same site. The early-Baroque layout takes the form of a basilica with one nave and two rows of side-chapels. The Baroque main altar was executed by the sculptor Francesco Robba. Many of the original frescoes were ruined by the cracks in the ceiling caused by the Ljubljana earthquake in 1895. The new frescoes were painted in 1936 by the Slovene impressionist painter Matej Sternen.

 

The front facade of the church was built in the Baroque style in 1703–1706 and redesigned in the 19th century. It has two parts, featuring pilasters with the Ionic capitals in the lower part and pilasters with Corinthian capitals in the upper part. The sides of the upper part are decorated with volutes and at the top of the front facade stands the statue of Our Lady of Loretto, i.e. Madonna with Child. It has been made of beaten copper by Matej Schreiner upon a plan drawn by Franz Kurz and Thurn und Goldenstein. The faces and the hands were modelled by Franc Ksaver Zajec. The statue replaced an older wooden statue of a Black Madonna in 1858. The facade also has three niches with sculptures of God the Father above the main stone portal, and an angel and the Virgin Mary in the side niches, work by the Baroque sculptor Paolo Callalo. There is a stone entrance staircase in front of the church. The wooden door with reliefs of women’s heads dates to the 19th century.

Ljubljana Cathedral or St. Nicholas’s Cathedral (stolnica sv. Nikolaja), serves the Archdiocese of Ljubljana. Easily identifiable due to its green dome and twin towers, it is located at Cyril and Methodius Square named for Saints Cyril and Methodius by the nearby Ljubljana Central Market and Town Hall.

The site of the Cathedral was originally occupied by a three-nave Romanic church whose earliest mention dates back to 1262. After the fire of 1361 it was re-vaulted in the Gothic style. When the Ljubljana Diocese was established in 1461, the church underwent several alterations and additions. In 1469 it was burnt down, presumably by the Turks. Between 1701 and 1706, a new Baroque hall church with side chapels shaped in the form of the Latin cross was built to a design by the Jesuit architect Andrea Pozzo. As the church’s dome was only built in 1841, originally a fake dome was painted on the arch above the centre of the cross. The surviving Baroque interior decoration notably includes frescoes by Giulio Quaglio (painted in the periods 1703-1706 and 1721-1723), Angelo Putti’s statues of four bishops of Emona situated beneath the beams of the dome (1712-1713), Putti’s painting of Dean Janez Anton Dolničar (1715), who initiated the rebuilding of the church in 1701, Francesco Robba’s altar angels in the left part of the nave (1745-1750) and brothers Paolo and Giuseppe Groppelli’s altar angels in the right part of the nave (1711). A host of other works of art were added later. One of the more interesting is the dome fresco painted by Matevž Langus in 1844. The most outstanding 20th century additions include Tone Demšar’s main entrance door relief depicting the history of Slovenia, commissioned to mark the 1250th anniversary of Christianity in Slovenia, and Mirsad Begić’s side doors with portraits of bishops.

Only a tourist train leaves Prešeren Square every day, transporting tourists to Ljubljana Castle.

The castle of Ljubljana is just one of the castles in the city but certainly the biggest one and also the most visited. Built in the middle of the 15th century, today it is a popular tourist destination for locals and foreigners also. No wonder. It offers an outstanding view over the city, a romantic athmosphere and a place of numerous cultural events. Guided tours of the castle are conducted every day. The castle is depicted on the city’s coat of arms, along with a dragon on top.

When in 1335 the Habsburgs took over the area of today`s Slovenia, they demolished the fortress of the Spanheim family, which stood on the hill, and in the second half of the 15th century started building a new one that still stands today. At first it consisted of only walls, towers and wooden barracks but through centuries the castle got the shape that it has today. Its main purpose was to defend against Turkish invasions, which were the most frequent in the 15th and 16th century. Besides, peasant rebellions were not rare as well. In the 17th and 18th century the castle had the function of a military hospital and an arsenal. When in 1809 Napoleon brought freedom and cultural and national enlightment to the citizens of Ljubljana, the war with the Habsburgs broke out. During this war the Pipers tower was demolished and a new wooden one erected on the place of today`s stone one. After the French had left, the Habsburgs used the castle for jails.  Several famous people were jailed in the castle, including the Italian revolutionary Silvio Pellico, the Hungarian Prime Minister Lajos Batthyany and the Slovene author Ivan Cankar. The jail period lasted until the end of the Second World War, when first Italians and after their capitulation Germans took over the management of the castle. Until 1963 ostracized citizens of Ljubljana lived on the castle in terrible conditions. In the 70s the renovation began and today the castle is a popular tourist destination for home and foreign visitors.

The castle Chapel of St. George, on the basis of a document of the year 1489 emitted by the emperor, was consecrated to St. George, St. Pancracio and the Empress Helena. The original entrance to the chapel was in the north; it was reached along thirteen steps and is in use to this day. The original Gothic chapel had openings in the ceiling, counted four gothic windows and a balcony from which the nobles listened to the Holy Mass. This construction was restored in Baroque style and in the year 1747 they added images of the shields of the governors.

Above the Chapel stands the panoramic tower….

….if you’re brave enough to climb the many, many steps inside, you’re awarded with a beautiful view over the castle courtyard, and the amazing view of the city…

Can you recognize some of the places I told you about…..from ground level?

We walked one morning through the east part of town, past more stunning buildings…

…..to have lunch in a very special place, enjoying some beautiful music…

…..before reaching the nice Tivoli Park, where we spent a lazy afternoon….

Tivoli City Park is the largest park in Ljubljana. It was designed in 1813 by the French engineer Jean Blanchard and now covers approximately 5 km2The park was laid out during the French imperial administration of Ljubljana in 1813 and named after the ParisianJardins de Tivoli. Between 1921 and 1939, it was renovated by the Slovene architect Jože Plečnik. Within the park, there are different types of trees, flower gardens, several statues, and fountains. Several notable buildings stand in the park, among them Tivoli Castle, the National Museum of Contemporary History and the Tivoli Sports Hall.

 

We had a great time in Ljubljana, and we highly recommend a visit there, history, magic places, good food and beers, and so very nice people….

 
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Posted by on October 24, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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Updates – Six – June

June, where summer really begins….

Near the river Po, there’s a village called Zibello, known all around the world for a culinary excellence, culatello….every year, the first week-end of june all the area celebrates it with dinner, concerts, games, markets and debates with italian top chefs…….could we miss the chance to eat something so good?

However, the best part of the dinner was the company, as always…….

The village was full of people, all the shops and tourists’ attractions were open………

and I just couldn’t pass the chance to visit the local main church…….

Following the foundation of the marquisate of Zibello, Giovan Francesco Pallavicino, the first gentleman of the small state, before his death expressed the desire to complete the construction of the Dominican convent, which he started in 1494, and a church in the village that served as a family chapel; it was only in the middle of the sixteenth century that the work for the church was started, on the initiative of the Marquis Uberto Pallavicino, before he was forced to surrender the marquisate to the Rangoni of Modena.

The work was concluded around 1580 but the church was consecrated only in 1620; elevated to parish, assumed the functions of the church of the Blessed Virgin of Graces , until then it was dedicated to the saints Gervasio and Protasio. In 1673 the rectory was erected attached to the church, while the bell tower was built in 1677, at the wish of the parish priest don Gardini.

The imposing church develops on a three-nave plant, with three chapels in the absidial area and a baptistery beside the entrance. The symmetrical salient facade , made of red brick in Gothic-Lombard style, is marked in three parts by buttresses surmounted by high tented roofs; in the middle there is a large rose window framed by terracotta tiles made by Jacopo de Stavolis around 1484. On the left side of the façade, the baptistery rises with Renaissance tracts, on which an octagonal dome rises. 

Inside, the three aisles are subdivided by a high colonnade whose decorated capitals support elegant arched bows, whose solemnity is accentuated by ornamental motifs that frame them, and from high vaulted ceiling, repeated in the same shapes even in the lower aisles.

To the left is the baptistery, covered by an octagonal, featuring 19th century decorations by Girolamo Magnani, a scenographer.

The left chapel houses a particular relic of the patron saint of the country, Saint Carlo Borromeo, a piece of the robe he wore on the day when he was extraordinarily saved by an attack. 

The next day we had another culinary date in the city center…..the second edition of Gola Gola Festival, the first after Parma was nominated Unesco City of Gastronomy, so this year the foods stands were even more…

our friend A with two new friends….lol…

For dinner we opted for a very much loved abruzzo excellence, arrosticini

and obviously a little dancing was mandatory!

The night of June 23 is the magic night for excellence. There are, in fact, very ancient popular traditions and profound esoteric and religious meanings that Saint John’s recurrence is linked to the summer solstice that corresponds to the winter one that is remembered at Christmas. In conjunction with the summer solstice, when the sun reaches its maximum positive declination and then resumes the winter walk, begins the summer, so St. John is the supreme solar festival, the overwhelming victory of light on darkness, good on bad. But the most clear and eloquent explanation on the important and significant astral situation is provided by Maria Castelli Zanzucchi, a writer, a scholar of traditions and author of interesting publications: “The sun reaches the highest point on 23 June: it is common knowledge that the night of St. John is the best time for planets and zodiacal signs to give stones and herbs their virtues. It is a magical night, the night of the impossible, of wonders, deceit, evil influences and witches. “

In Parma and around, the traditions of the “rozáda äd San Zvan” (dialect for dew of Saint John) are countless: from the best known, such as the gastronomic dish “tortelli di erbetta” (chard ravioli), to those less well-known, whose origins are lost in the night of time. Preferably the “tortelli” are made to be enjoyed with the feet under the outdoor table, but inside is allowed too, as long as you leave the door and windows open to favor the benefits of dewy influences……better if with dear friends and surrounded by flowers and herbs collected the year before…

Another month gone, leaving great memories of food, places and dear faces……..

 
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Posted by on October 17, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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Updates – Two – April

The begining of april was sunny and warm….suitable for early motorbike outings…

First of all, a day off with a former collegue of mine and her husband, at their seaside home in Lido degli Estensi….comparing the two new bikes…..lol….

….and after a short boat ride…..

to Porto Garibaldi for lunch……

the best catalana salad ever!

After that, a digestive walk………..

Easter Sunday lunch “chez maman”………..

…and the afternoon spent with our bikers/dancers friends at a local event in town…..

We decided that considering the good forecast for Easter Monday, we could give a try to a place we read about some time ago…..and the day for just perfect for bikes!

Chignolo Po Castle is one of the most sumptuous castle residences in Lombardy. The oldest part is the tower which was built to defend the Po river and the trading routes between northern Europe and Italy. The castle was built in the thirteenth century and transformed into a princely palace in the eighteenth century in an inventive stylistic reinvention of the building. Its present form is a majestic earthenware building surmounted by a hanging gallery held up by stone ledges.

The oldest part of the castle is the great tower, from which is controlled a long stretch of the Po (Cuneulus super Padum). It is believed that it was built by King Liutprando around 740 AD, when Pavia was the capital of the Lombards, in order to serve as a fortress of defense and garrison on the Po and the Via di Monte Bordone, later called via Francigena – Romea linking northern Europe with Rome.

In 1251, the Abbot of the Abbey of Santa Cristina appointed a Head of the Government of the Castle and the extensive territories attached to it. The castle, shortly since the thirteenth century, became one of the major Lombard fief, on which the Pusterla family first settled, until in 1340 that family was involved in an anti-Visconti conspiracy and fiercely exterminated. They were followed by the Federici and the Cusani, which maximize the power of the castle, also constantly receiving privileges and concessions from the King and the Dukes of Milan. From 1700 to 1730 it was expanded and transformed from a medieval fortress in a true eighteenth-century palace, where stayed popes, emperors, kings, princes and Archduke.
Artists from the school of Tiepolo was entrusted with the implementation of the stucco and paintings that adorn the rooms of the castle.
The works were done at the behest and funding of the owner at the time, Cardinal Agostino Cusani Visconti (1655 – 1715), who was Ambassador of the Pope at the Venetian Republic and at the Court of Louis XIV in Paris.
Following this impressive work, the Castle of Chignolo Po was called and known worldwide as the Versailles of Lombardy”.

Our guide before entering the castle, explaining us the history of the place and te rules (no photos inside, being that a private residence….well I managed to sneak a few…lol)

Below, the ceiling of the entrance arch…

The inner courtyard and a couple of painted ceilings inside….

The backyard (being in fact the main entrance, towards the village)

The complex is surrounded by a large English park, featuring a spectacular tea-house from the eighteenth century, and includes the Borgo, a series of palaces located behind the castle and built in 1600, which has a moat and four towers along the outer sides

We had a reservation at a cozy restaurant near the castle, along the river Po….

It was really a beautiful day, we had really a gret time with our friends, enjoying the good weather finally….

 

 
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Posted by on October 12, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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Updates – One – March

After a short and not so cold month of february, almost lacking of events, march started with a nice late afternoon meeting, celebrating a collegue wedding, in a very well known place in the city center…..

Then we brought home a new road companion, for the happiness of my husband….and for the sake of my lower back!

One sunny sunday we drove to our friends’ country home to have lunch together…….

…..and to fix a date for a guided visit to a stunning private palace in town.

Well, it seems I have some recurring names and places in my life…… I’v been in that palace before a few times (work related), but I only saw a few rooms. Open to the public exceptionally for a day, Palazzo Pallavicino, a historic baroque residence in the heart of Parma, was shown to the members of a cultural association that arranged the appointment, by the marquise Maria Gabriella Pigoli Pallavicino and Professor Carlo Mambriani (an historian) who led the participants through the stunning rooms of the private residence. And amazing as it was, the marquis Maria Gabriella recognized me after so many years and at the end of the visit she kindly gave us half an hour of her time chatting about our lives after the last time we met  …… very kind of her, don’t you think?

The palace was commissioned by Alfonso Pallavicino from Zibello in 1646 and built on the spot of a 15th century palace belonging to the Sforza of Santafiora family (the square before the palace still has the same name). The façade dates back to 1705 and is characterised by windows of different sizes and designs surrounded by marble, with a balcony held up by corbels.

Inside, from a baroque courtyard, a balustrade staircase with three flights in Bolognese style of the end of the 17th century  adorned with statues, leads up to several rooms with stucco, Austrian marble fireplaces, mirrors, paintings, a Chinese salon with 18th century marble floors and a salon frescoed by Sebastiano Galeotti. Four works are by Girolamo Donnini, including The flight of Eneid from Troy, The flight of Ifigenia from the temple of Artemides, Medea and Jason and Diomedes revealing the faked madness of Ulysses. Donnini also painted the ceilings, as well the artist from Bologna, Aureliano Milani, depicting Hercules in many of his works.

Just the staircase is worth the visit….

The visit started at the long hallway that i remembered so well, where the marquise was waiting for us……

then, her precious bridge room, a card game always loved by her and her late husband….

….the conversation room…..

….the Chinese salon…..

….the dining room….

….the library where the late marquis Pierluigi used to meet me….

It was really an amazing experience for me, just like it was anytime I met that kind couple, so many years ago….thank you Lady Gabriella for a wonderful time!

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on October 11, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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I’m back! ….for a one shot, at least….

It’s been ages since last time I posted something….and lots of things happened of course….here is a little re-cap of my life in the last few months….

First of all there was an event in mid-september to present the opening of the Parma branch of the dance school where our friends/cousins teach….

September was a busy month….One of my favourite events…a country night

…..then the wedding of dear friends of our daughter, a very nice celebration…….and their little boy was the center of all the attentions…

….. a day out at the end of the month, discovering a new place, to savour and taste a rural market, where our friends were selling their fruit and olive plants

It was a great place, near to us but left ignored for way too long, a very nice surprise, full of great buildings and lot of history behind those walls…

In october we had a night all together to say goodbye to a couple of our neighbours moving away….

Mid-october we spent a day in Murano (a very beautiful island in the Venice lagoon)  to visit the Glass Museum where maestro Vianello had some of his pieces displayed… (remember Mauro and my glass ducks?) It was a stunning visit……

Below, one of Vianello creations….

We did enjoy the sunny day to walk around….the beautiful Church of St Mary and St Donato….

…and another desecrated church, St Chiara, now a glass workshop….

I’ll never get tired of this beautiful place!

Usually we don’t take time off in fall/winter, but last october it was different. We just needed a few days off, after a very busy period renovating our daughter home, so we choose France for a short vacation. We had our hotel (below) in Salon-de-Provence, and we just drove around between Provence and Camargue…..

Salon-de-Provence was really a nice surprise….the old centere of the village was full of cozy and beautiful corners…starting with the fountains, all green and more like trees….

….or the clock tower, that signs the time of the residents since ages….

….every street and every square holding something to remember…..maybe a modern statue of Nostradamus who lived and died here….

A more classic statue of Nostradamus…

….beautiful mansions and gardens….

And obviously there is a castle….

We had a great time spending a sunny and warm day at Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer, being there after 20 years since the first time….

The first time we didn’t get into the church, it was closed for some event rehersal, but this time we did!

Can you tell the majority of the people living here are Gypsy from Spain?

One morning we decided to visit a “savonnerie” (soap factory) and we didn’t come out empty handed….

We spent the rest of the day between an old pirates outpost and the “salines” (salt evaporation pond)….

It was a nice trip, and we’d like to come back in the area next fall as well….

Me and daughter spent a day in Milan for a job interview…..and nope, she didn’t get the job. At least, we had a very good lunch…

Mid-november we had dinner with some friends, savouring a very tasty bistecca fiorentina

At the beginning of december my daughter boyfriend’s parents came to spend a few days with him so we got the chance to know each others and have lunch together with my mother too…

Last december with some of our friends, we resurrected what used to be a Christmas tradition for some years, the making of “spongata“…..beside having something to give as a gift, the tradition was just to have fun and spend some quality time all together, having lunch as well…

The final result ready for the oven….

And then it was Christmas time…Eve’s dinner at home as usual…

To celebrate the arrival of the new year, we had dinner out with some friends (with daughter and her bf/friends in a nearby table….lol) in a unpretentious place, but very good…

First event of the new year was the classic, by now, Epiphany on bike….to bring gifts to the Children Hospital’s patients…

Another classic already, the charity dinner for our friends’ son in Brazil….

Finally, after some time we had the chance to meet with our friends from Modena….obviously at lunch!

Our friend S with a partner, opened a tex-mex restaurant….we were there for dinner one night of course….

And this is all, at least till the end of january…..but two big event took place among all those above…hubby retirement (at last!) in mid-december, celebrated at his workplace with all his collegues….including gifts and jokes…

…and daughter M finally moving to her new home in january…

So now we’re officially empty nesters…..and we miss her so very much….but that’s life, right?

Till next time, take care….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on April 11, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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